Author Topic: """radical""" ""Islam in America""  (Read 2754 times)

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Offline Amazon D

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"""radical""" ""Islam in America""
« on: January 25, 2013, 11:59:47 am »
 """radical""" ""Islam in America""

MUST WATCH VIDEO OR ELSE WE ALL LOSE

http://thethirdjihad.com/ 30-Minute Version of the New Documentary Film. The Third Jihad movie exposes the war the media is not telling you about. It reveals the enemy our U.S. government is too afraid to name. One person who is not afraid to tell you the truth is Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, a Muslim American and former physician to the U.S. Congress. After the FBI releases a radical Islamist manifesto describing how to destroy America from within, Dr. Jasser decides to investigate.

The Third Jihad is about what he discovered. Interviews are conducted with radical Islamists in America and the leaders trying to stop them, such as Rudy Giuliani, Clinton CIA Director Jim Woolsey, NYC Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Senator Joe Lieberman, former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge, and former terrorist group member Tawfik Hamid.

This is a film about Radical Islamic terror in America. A dangerous ideology, fuelled by religious hatred. It's important to remember, most Muslims are peaceful and do not support terror. This is not a film about them.


Radical Islam In America
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Offline Kia

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Re: """radical""" ""Islam in America""
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2013, 07:48:38 pm »
also important to note that the "Islamist, Jihadist" ideology isn't really in touch with traditional Islam. much like how in the past Christianity was used to support slavery and the superiority of white Europeans. Hyper-Orthodox Islamic thought is used by a small group of people to unite their people against a new wave of Western Imperialism, nations like Iraq, Jordan, Syria were not founded until the 20th century after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and existed originally as European protectorates where the resources and people were exploited by Western European powers. Before that the land was ruled by numerous Islamic states, called Caliphs or sultanates, and historically these states were socially progressive and egalitarian in the manner of actual Islam and share few similarities with the new "Islamo-fascist" (a terrible portmanteau) regimes that are merely reactionary movements against decades of Western exploitation, using Islam and Shariah as a cohesive element to unite a populace against the West. in the same way that we in the West brand them Jihadist and terrorists to unify our populace against a group of people wanting nothing to do with us.

Islam is not a threat, we in the West should also put thought towards why these people feel the need to launch violent campaigns against us (it might have to do with illegal military occupations, drone bombings, economic exploitation, and cultural hijacking, supporting dictatorial regimes and all sorts of other stuff). despite that terrorism was originally coined by Robespierre in the French Revolution as a state sponsored policy to convince the people to turn towards utopian revolutionary virtue. the more apt word insurgency is the "surgical strike opportunity of the oppressed" against impossibly more technologically advanced and economically superior powers.

Also the issue of Jihad which is in academics often defined as  greater and lesser variants, the greater Jihad is the individuals internal struggle with the self that disconnects them from Allah. the lesser jihad is what we commonly know as holy war a sentiment that in its most widely used context is quite medieval when Muslims had to defend the Islamic state established by the spiritual descendants of the Prophet Muhammad. So these political radicals that claim Jihad are using a traditional tenet of Islam to legitimize this struggle against exploitative and domineering Western society. If we could step back and see this from their point of view maybe we wouldn't have such a reactionary stand point towards Islam which is in truth a very rich and beautiful religious culture.

Now finally and most importantly, this topic is and discussion is not inherently about Islamic spirituality but about a varied and complex geopolitical and historical issue enfolded with religious equality and intolerance dealing with imperialism, oppression, and revolutionary action so I would kindly ask that a moderator move this topic to a more relevant sub-forum so that some one wishing to learn about Islam and it's opinion and relationship with trans* issues does not get derailed by topics regarding issues not dealing immediately with Spirituality and religious thought. Islam has numerous avenues regarding radical spirituality which should not be confused with radical politics wrapped in Islamic thought.

 

Offline Amazon D

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Re: """radical""" ""Islam in America""
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2013, 08:20:28 pm »
also important to note that the "Islamist, Jihadist" ideology isn't really in touch with traditional Islam. much like how in the past Christianity was used to support slavery and the superiority of white Europeans. Hyper-Orthodox Islamic thought is used by a small group of people to unite their people against a new wave of Western Imperialism, nations like Iraq, Jordan, Syria were not founded until the 20th century after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and existed originally as European protectorates where the resources and people were exploited by Western European powers. Before that the land was ruled by numerous Islamic states, called Caliphs or sultanates, and historically these states were socially progressive and egalitarian in the manner of actual Islam and share few similarities with the new "Islamo-fascist" (a terrible portmanteau) regimes that are merely reactionary movements against decades of Western exploitation, using Islam and Shariah as a cohesive element to unite a populace against the West. in the same way that we in the West brand them Jihadist and terrorists to unify our populace against a group of people wanting nothing to do with us.

Islam is not a threat, we in the West should also put thought towards why these people feel the need to launch violent campaigns against us (it might have to do with illegal military occupations, drone bombings, economic exploitation, and cultural hijacking, supporting dictatorial regimes and all sorts of other stuff). despite that terrorism was originally coined by Robespierre in the French Revolution as a state sponsored policy to convince the people to turn towards utopian revolutionary virtue. the more apt word insurgency is the "surgical strike opportunity of the oppressed" against impossibly more technologically advanced and economically superior powers.

Also the issue of Jihad which is in academics often defined as  greater and lesser variants, the greater Jihad is the individuals internal struggle with the self that disconnects them from Allah. the lesser jihad is what we commonly know as holy war a sentiment that in its most widely used context is quite medieval when Muslims had to defend the Islamic state established by the spiritual descendants of the Prophet Muhammad. So these political radicals that claim Jihad are using a traditional tenet of Islam to legitimize this struggle against exploitative and domineering Western society. If we could step back and see this from their point of view maybe we wouldn't have such a reactionary stand point towards Islam which is in truth a very rich and beautiful religious culture.

Now finally and most importantly, this topic is and discussion is not inherently about Islamic spirituality but about a varied and complex geopolitical and historical issue enfolded with religious equality and intolerance dealing with imperialism, oppression, and revolutionary action so I would kindly ask that a moderator move this topic to a more relevant sub-forum so that some one wishing to learn about Islam and it's opinion and relationship with trans* issues does not get derailed by topics regarding issues not dealing immediately with Spirituality and religious thought. Islam has numerous avenues regarding radical spirituality which should not be confused with radical politics wrapped in Islamic thought.

That makes sense but what are people here to do who had no power to stop the power mongers in wash DC? We still have to protect ourselves from the threat of both groups now !!
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Offline Aleah

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Re: """radical""" ""Islam in America""
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2013, 09:37:19 pm »
Maybe if the U.S. administrations and intelligence forces didn't radicalize these marginalized and insignificant forces to begin with and create a political and ideological cluster**** in the region. The Taliban was funded and trained to drag the Soviets into a quagmire in Afghanistan and to overthrow a Socialist pro-Soviet government.

Check out the Brzezinski interview or read his book, The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy And Its Geostrategic Imperatives by Zbigniew Brzezinski.

Considering he was national security advisor during that time his insights are very enlightening.

Seems like everyone suffers from long term memory loss though..

You want to kill radical Islamic doctrine? Stop supporting Saudi Arabia and it's dissemination of Wahhabi/Salafi ideology, that is the real threat to both the Muslim people and everyone else. I don't think any U.S. administration will do that until they have achieved geopolitical supremacy over the region.

I don't know how anyone can honestly believe that these forces, poorly armed and trained militias, are any threat to the only superpower in the world who's military and intelligence expenditure is larger than that of all nations in the world combined.

Also I don't really see what this propaganda has to do with Islam and spirituality at all since it has nothing to do with helping understanding Islam or even shed any light on what Wahhabi/Salafi doctrine really is.. it only adds to the confusion and fuels war propaganda through fear mongering.

It only helps to serve the agenda of these extremists by creating casus belli in public opinion for expanding the war efforts that only make the problem worse by creating more suffering and mistrust in the Muslim world.

You should also have a read of Blowback, The Costs and Consequences of American Empire by Chalmers Johnson.

This kind of blowback was predicated and expected even before the Project for a New American Century was officially adopted.

Offline Kia

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Re: """radical""" ""Islam in America""
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2013, 09:44:12 pm »
Quote
That makes sense but what are people here to do who had no power to stop the power mongers in wash DC? We still have to protect ourselves from the threat of both groups now !!

Like i said, the American government is so far ahead of the "radical" factions opposed to it in as far as economic capacity, military ability, and access to high-technology. The intelligence and security wings of the government are very aware of the actions of these people if we take into account phone-tapping, vehicle tracking, credit card and bank records (who's taking out money, how much and where are they spending it) as well as cyber surveillance these domestic terror threats are left to face-to-face interaction and taking very precarious steps to prevent suspicion and counter-terrorist action against them. this more or less removes their insurgent potency. take this as an example http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/10/fbi-tracking-device/ the government is tracking any perceived threat which is a very broad group of our society. In my opinion the US government has a pretty good hold on those real threats to national security and handle them before things before they get out of hand. How many people are arrested for domestic terror charges without the knowledge of the general populace?

As far as international threats we are led to believe that these Al Qaeda groups and the like are off hiding in caves and secret bunkers and are no where to be found when in reality a paramilitary training camp is kind of hard to hide from high altitude recon planes, now their low tech does work to their advantage as it's difficult to track hidden letters in mountains of Afghanistan and to discern a prayer group from an insurgent cell. But I imagine that if their war with America is more concerned with their own national identity, rather than conquer us i think they immediately want cultural sovereignty rather than a KFC on every corner and Halliburton oil refineries in the deserts. The American populace is threatened more by our own ignorant consumerism and lack of cohesive identity. So much of American culture is appropriated from those immigrants who helped shape the nation, a good example is that in the process of self discovery we always turn towards Eastern spirituality or other foreign or historical modalities rather than going through the actual process of self creation for ourselves.

As a nation we are safe and secure, the tragedy of 9/11 stands as an exception. if we imagine ourselves as the people in charge of national security just how many perceived threats and rumours pass our desk every day? and the strategy of the 9/11 attack sounded absurd at the time a coordinated hijacking of multiple airplanes and flying through one of the most heavily regulated and trafficked airspace and crashing into buildings. We would have to decide which threats to allocate resources to combat and that one probably just sounded to improbable. but after the fact we are now super concerned about a repeat of that tragedy, but now that we understand the lengths people will go to we know what to look for.

We are an information society we are very far removed from immediate experience. You and I are having a conversation and exchanging information gathered from other sources from different parts of the nation all thanks to the super connective structure of the internet. America is no longer a production economy as we have outsourced all those jobs, we as a society find ourselves for the most part living our lives through our technology our cars, computers, televisions and brand identity we have lost touch with basic humanity. So I would suggest instead of concerning ourselves with the fabricated drama of terrorists and radical dissidents we focus on authentic rediscovery of the human experience. If we get to know ourselves as individuals we can then form a properly cohesive collective for the new millennium and the new global schema. The powerlessness of the people is an illusion supported by the massive monolithic appearance of the government institution but the reality of it is that we as individuals are sovereigns in our own skin and should not fear the controlling grasp of government nor the threat of anti-American sentiment in the world, as both are only temporary, governments fall or adapt to the changing geopolitical climate and revolutionary (subversive, insurgent, terrorist) groups by their nature either dissolve, fail in the attempt at revolution, or take the place of the "evil" they oppose. The Iranian Revolution seemed at the time to be a return to the old high point of the Islamic golden age but instead has collapsed into a government no better than the Western supported Shah the Ayatollah's overthrew. It's my opinion that this period of "Islamic radicalism" is merely a death throe of 19th century nationalist thought, much like the hyper-patriotic security state that the US has become. But change is
inevitable and all we can do is be prepared for it and hold onto the only constant in our lives and that is our integral, inherent sense of self.

sorry for the rambling philosophy ;)

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