Author Topic: 'I am a girl': Transgender children face a society slow to accept them  (Read 962 times)

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Offline DriftingCrow

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http://www.kansascity.com/2014/02/08/4808436/i-am-a-girl-transgender-children.html
Eric Adler; The Kansas City Star

**this site does not let you copy and paste, so here's just a small summary of the article**

A.J. started out being seen by her elementary-school peers as a boy, and was well accepted. When she came out as a girl, invitations to birthdays stopped, parents gave funny looks and even cross the street when A.J. and her parents are out on the sidewalk. Kids at school were accepting until they went home and talked to their parents, now A.J. is home schooled.

LGBT advocates agree that acceptance of transgender people has fallen behind acceptance for gays and lesbians, however greater attention to trans* issues has become more noticeable in recent times. 

A.J.'s parents describe how they discovered the their child was really a girl and decided to allow her to live as female.
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Offline Kyra553

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Re: 'I am a girl': Transgender children face a society slow to accept them
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2014, 09:30:41 am »
Great article. Its pretty much every thing a trans is, in a nutshell. I really related to this because I live in the same state as the child.

Jamie D

Re: 'I am a girl': Transgender children face a society slow to accept them
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2014, 03:14:18 pm »
She is only 6 years old. Already the child who sits, legs tucked, on a canopied bed near a closet filled with princess dresses has lost her best friends.

Kids who used to ask A.J. to birthday parties stopped calling.

Parents back in preschool avoided making eye contact.

Once, at a ballet open house, A.J. and her mom ran into a family with whom they had always been close.

“They looked at us,” the Kansas City mother recalls, “crossed the sidewalk and didn’t say anything.”

“For a while it made me hate humanity,” she conceded. “ ‘You just proved yourselves to be the lowest human beings on the planet. You know my kid. You know my child is a happy, kind, sweet, considerate kid and nothing has changed, except …’ ”

Except that A.J., born and known to all as a boy, had been determined to be transgender. The rough-and-tumble kid who once sported buzz cuts and dressed for his birthday as a pirate was growing her chestnut hair below her shoulders.

A.J. was now a girl.



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