Author Topic: insurance privacy  (Read 6197 times)

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molly

insurance privacy
« on: December 30, 2005, 01:59:34 pm »
I have a question about realistic expectations regarding medical insurance privacy.  If I go to to see a therapist for my TG questions, etc, how much information is shared with employer?

I live in California if this makes any difference.

Molly

Cassandra

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2005, 07:57:19 pm »
I'm not really sure and Dennis is our resident legal eagle here so he may have some clarification for you, but I believe your insurance company has the same requirement for medical confidentiality as your medical provider. Telling your employer would be a breach of your right to privacy.

Cassie

stephanie_craxford

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2005, 08:04:31 pm »
I believe you're right Cassie.  In Canada I submit my invoices to my insurance company but all that my Therapist lists on the invoice is "Professional Services" and the fee, she does not list what those services were.  So I would assume that your therapist should be doing the same.  However I'm not in California.

Steph

Sheila

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2005, 08:42:02 pm »
Molly, I don't believe that your therapist would give out any info about you or what you talked about. I believe that is all confidential. Just like what Steph said, my therapist used consultation on my insurance forms.
Sheila

Terri-Gene

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2005, 02:34:36 am »
its the confidentuality thing between Dr. and patient.  None of your medical information should or would be shared with anybody who doesn't have the right to see them.  As for California.  Last Summer a new law was signed that states TG/TS etc. can not be denied any needed care on basis of discrimination.  And you should be aware that as of Jan 01,2004, state law took effect that no employee could be discriminated or fired from a job based on TG status.  Further, California law recognizes TS persons as being disabled, and any reasonable accomidations have to be made for them by employers.

No, if you live in California, especially in any large city, you can walk the streets and work openly and without fear, except of course for the occassional rough neck who takes on any and all minorities as a course of life.  All I can tell you is I have walked the streets and haunts of the Sacramento area and openly worked at my job for about 4 years now and have as yet not had one serious altercation (other then in hangouts I'm sure you would not frequent).

In other words, it's none of your employers business about your medical records, though the company insurance might be interested if you had an accident, but they would have to ask you about any conditions.  I'm not a lawyer, so not always right, but I can't see a seconds worth of concern about any employer inquiry into your medical records of any kind and psych records especially.  I work for a hospital chain and can tell you medical records and psych records are kept seperate, but mention of trans subjects may be made in the medical record if it has any bearing on a physical conditoin.  Check it out if you like, but that is information that is kept in total confidence to any outside influence.

Terri

molly

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2005, 10:15:53 am »
Thank you for your responses.  I think this is one of the greatest strengths of Susans having all this knowledge and experience.

I am going to check into how my insurance works and try to schedule my first session in January/February 2006.  I guess I am a little paranoid at the moment, a little amazed at how fast I am falling down that rabbit hole.

Molly

Terri-Gene

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2006, 01:43:35 am »
Its going to feel like a roller coaster at first Molley and thinking will get confused at times because of the breaks in your concentration, but after a while you will sink your heels in and things will slow down.  Then the doubts set in.  Just be sure you have considered all the negative aspects and what you can or will have to do about them and realise that no matter how serious you are about completeing your mission, some doubts about how you will make it through are inevatible but if you really know yourself you will come through, but thats where you earn your battle ribbons.

Terri

molly

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2006, 01:55:32 pm »
I appreciate all the comments and support in responding to my question.  The experience all of you bring together is priceless.

I am impressed with how the hardship and difficulties are not downplayed.  I am also impressed with all the strong woman who are overcoming them.  I hope that I can find that inner strength in myself.

Your the best, Molly

Terri-Gene

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2006, 07:33:40 pm »
Quote
So those doubts are normal?


Yes they are Mellssa, though it also depends on what it is you doubt and why.  To a person who is in true need of transition, there is no choice but to do it regardless, but that doesn't mean that they necessarily have the mentality, experience and assets to really make it happen in as short a time as possible no matter how much they may need it.  Thats where the choices, conditions and doubts  come in.

For myself, I can say there is no reason for not abtaining surgery within income, socialbility, or environment that could get in my way other then the choices I make.  My only problem consistantly has been that of having to leave my woman of 26 years of life and 25 years of marrage behind to do it as quickly as I could.  To keep her will not stand in my way of achieving what I want, but will take more time when I have already exceeded all the time my mind feels it can spare.  To seperate from her would make it financially easy for me to complete myself very quickly in the position I peresently am in.

There are those feelings of past love and dependancy though that hold her to me, no matter how hard she makes it for me sometimes or hurts me because of her own doubts as to our future together.  Part of the problem is her dependancy on me.  For more then a year now she has not been able to work.  She has influensa, diabetes and has been emotionally near to mental breakdown ever since I actually started hormones and let her know that surgery was my only option.

This woman became my best friend at a time when I most needed one, having to care for two young daughters after my first wife died and I was in a lost world in coping with how to deal with raising those girls when I could not garuntee coming home every night or at all perhaps.  Perhaps mostly I needed and had to have a true friend to share and care for me through the nightmares and fears I lived with on an almost daily basis along with my problems of accepting the life I was living.  She was what I needed in those years and she never backed off or left me uncared for, despite what she often had to go through.  I can never forget that and I can never disregard or shirk from a loyal friend and companion, not even for my own needs.

We have split up before over the transition.  She said she would not stand for me to begin HRT, so When I did, she told me to pack up and get out.  I did so and made out quite well for some months until she said she could come to terms with it and asked me to move back with her.  Then she lost her job and could no longer work, leaving myself as her major support.  To leave her would mean a lot more money that I need for SRS, but to leave for a matter of cash would be a shallow thing to me and I would despise myself even after SRS if I were to do such a thing without first being able to secure her livelyhood.  To treat a person you had loved and delt with life with for such a reason would be so terribly dishonorable and I don't think that achieving anything on this earth would be worth such an immoral act.  So I must take care of her and while that means less money for the warchest and a slower path, so be it.  I would die before doing such a thing to a person I had loved for so much of my life.

What I'm saying Melissa is that no matter how serious you are, there are always things you have to weigh and they may not always be easy cut and dried choices, but if your doubts have deep concern as to who or what you are, and if things such as prestige, money, possessions etc. etc. are to important to lose, then a great reconsideration in what you will do with your life is at hand.

So simply keep in mind that as long as you are truely and without doubt who you are, there will still be considerations for what you are doing, how and when.  It is no embarrasement to be bothered or unsure of things that are of moral importance to you, just as long as you are not letting the morality of others affect you. 

Every thing in life has meaning and purpose, sometimes you have to be able to make decisions about what you can live with aside from yourself, but to do so you must be able to reason with yourself and know perfectly well what you can't live without besides your own needs.  It is a phylosophy in itself and applies only to yourself, but remember the old saying to be true to yourself and understand what that truth is and that it can concern many things.

Decide for yourself what is important to you in all ways as possible and do it, but don't break your own heart on the way.  I hope this makes some sense to you.

Terri

Kimberly

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2006, 06:15:32 pm »

Can I really afford this?


A similar question to ask and in the same vein, “Can I afford **NOT** to do this?” … I think I understand a few things Leigh has said a little better than I would like.

Leigh

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2006, 11:47:29 pm »
No matter which path is chosen there will a price to pay.

Right after I started transition I was told that what I was doing was courageous.  My explanition was this.

Courage is when you are walking down the street, a house is on fire and you can hear someone screaming for help.  Running in to save that person when you don't have to.  Risking your life with the possibility that both of you may perish, that is courage.  I was the person in the house screaming for help but no one could hear me.  I had two choices, stay and die in the fire or jump and hope I survived the fall.  That is deperation not courage.

If there is any option rather than transitioning take it and run.    The price of admission is damn steep and once you are in you may not like the show.  Problem is that once you have paid the price there is no exit and if by chance you find the emergency exit you won't end up back where you started from.

Im not talking about any person in particular, its anyone who is thinking and dreaming about transitioning.   Make a list of everything you think it will be like after transition and surgery.  Got it done?  Good now throw it away because almost nothing on the list will be accurate.  I see the problem as people plan to transition instead they should plan through transition.  What about the after life?  Where do you go now?  The euphoria is gone, nothing exciting to look forward to.  Its just another life day after day.  You work, shop, sleep and eat.  The total difference is that the physical has changed to hopefully match the mental.  If you make it through the first five years after surgery count yourself among the lucky 50% ( or so I have been told).

Am I trying to put the brakes on people?  Damn right I am.  This isn't a game where you can call re do's after a certain point.  It isn't fun and it isn't easy so step back and think before you jump.  Maybe you are in the frying pan and not really in the fire!

Leigh


Offline Dennis

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Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2006, 03:20:19 pm »
That's funny Leigh, that's exactly the same analogy I use when people say I'm "courageous". I tell them that that depends on whether you see it as running into a burning house or running out of one. For me, it was running out of one.

And Leigh's right. If it isn't running out of a burning house for you, then there may be other options that don't carry the social, mental health, and physical health risks that transitioning does.

Dennis

Offline Jillieann Rose

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Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2006, 01:55:39 am »
I appreciate your posting Leigh and Terri.
The process of finding out about my options is not easy.
I'm still learning who I really am and what I need (have to have) to be true to myself.
I thank you both for you honesty and sobering words.
 :)
Jillieann


Jessica

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2006, 08:00:15 am »
Quote
If you make it through the first five years after surgery count yourself among the lucky 50%

Are you saying that only 50% of post-op's live longer than 5 years after their surgery?

Leigh

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2006, 09:16:17 am »
Are you saying that only 50% of post-op's live longer than 5 years after their surgery?

Sorry, I should have been clearer.

Some so die.  Suicide, an extremely small percentage due to medical complications relating to the surgery, failure to follow the correct aftercare procedures.  Some because they put themselves in situations with somone unaware of their history and some because this takes place late in life and their natural life span just plain ran out.

There are some that for finiancial reasons detransition to a certain point just to find work or end up working in the sex trade (which I don't consider living) to hopefully survive.

Some find out that they are not prepared for what is and become hermits only coming out to work if they have a job and shop otherwise they never go out which is living but not a life at least in my opinion.

Leigh




stephanie_craxford

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2006, 10:35:01 am »
No matter which path is chosen there will a price to pay.

Right after I started transition I was told that what I was doing was courageous.  My explanition was this.

Courage is when you are walking down the street, a house is on fire and you can hear someone screaming for help.  Running in to save that person when you don't have to.  Risking your life with the possibility that both of you may perish, that is courage.  I was the person in the house screaming for help but no one could hear me.  I had two choices, stay and die in the fire or jump and hope I survived the fall.  That is deperation not courage.

If there is any option rather than transitioning take it and run.    The price of admission is damn steep and once you are in you may not like the show.  Problem is that once you have paid the price there is no exit and if by chance you find the emergency exit you won't end up back where you started from.

Im not talking about any person in particular, its anyone who is thinking and dreaming about transitioning.   Make a list of everything you think it will be like after transition and surgery.  Got it done?  Good now throw it away because almost nothing on the list will be accurate.  I see the problem as people plan to transition instead they should plan through transition.  What about the after life?  Where do you go now?  The euphoria is gone, nothing exciting to look forward to.  Its just another life day after day.  You work, shop, sleep and eat.  The total difference is that the physical has changed to hopefully match the mental.  If you make it through the first five years after surgery count yourself among the lucky 50% ( or so I have been told).

Am I trying to put the brakes on people?  Damn right I am.  This isn't a game where you can call re do's after a certain point.  It isn't fun and it isn't easy so step back and think before you jump.  Maybe you are in the frying pan and not really in the fire!

Leigh

This post should be marked and almost be required reading for anyone who is thinking of transitioning.  I'll definitely be quoting it.  Short sweet and to the point... No BS.

Steph

molly

Re: insurance privacy
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2006, 12:10:00 pm »
I think your absolutely right Leigh that this is serious business and no one should have fantasies or illusions about transition and turning ones life inside out.  I read in one of the post something along the lines that after transition some things don't change:  if your a positive person, if your short, if your into specific hobbies, if your overweiht, underweight or just right for you, if your...you get the picture - you will still be those things.

Personally I want to get professional help to ensure I make the right decisions for me.  Your experience and those of everyone else here at Susan's is more grist for mill to consider as I move forward on this journey.

LoL, Molly

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