Author Topic: what if?  (Read 2751 times)

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emilyking

what if?
« on: January 02, 2015, 04:30:06 pm »
What if, you had one wish and your wish was to the other gender.
And the being giving the wish, could change you but you had to keep your original chromosomes.
So if your XY, you would be an XY Female.

Would you still change?

Personally, I would do it in a heartbeat.
Happy new years!

Offline Elsa Delyth

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Re: what if?
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2015, 05:04:33 pm »
I don't see why not. Basically be like those born with androgen-insensitivity syndrome.
"If I can't dance, I don't want to be part of your revolution." Emma Goldman.

Offline Beverly

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Re: what if?
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2015, 05:08:33 pm »
And the being giving the wish, could change you but you had to keep your original chromosomes.
So if your XY, you would be an XY Female.

Would you still change?

Of course. It is what I have done anyway. It just took a bit longer than snapping my fingers.

Offline sam1234

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Re: what if?
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2015, 10:42:17 pm »
I would change without a second thought. There are very few incidences where your genotype would be looked at, and give that your body said otherwise, it would probably be written off as an excuse. When I got my first driver's license changed from F to M, all I had to do was to walk in and tell them that when I received the card, the wrong gender had been put on it. They changed it, no questions asked.

Now if you are talking about being born in the appropriate gender, I'd have to think twice. In some ways, it would have made life much easier, but I might not have been the same person. Many of our personality traits come from the trials and tribulations that we go through in life. If I didn't have to go through all that I did, I might not have the empathy I do or some other characteristics.

There is a chance you would never even know that your genotype said you were the opposite gender your body said it was. Other than checking it when you are first born, there wouldn't be much reason to do it.

sam1234

Offline Jessica Merriman

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Re: what if?
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2015, 11:54:58 pm »
I would not change a thing myself. Being me with my life experiences made a successful transition work out. I am a product of both lives and valueable lessons learned in both. :)

Offline TheMissingM

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Re: what if?
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2015, 08:05:12 pm »
Either way you look at it, it's no different from what happens at the end of our transition anyways.

I'd change it in a heartbeat.. I wouldn't care if my looks stayed the same.

Offline LizK

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Re: what if?
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2015, 09:25:16 pm »
What if, you had one wish and your wish was to the other gender.
And the being giving the wish, could change you but you had to keep your original chromosomes.
So if your XY, you would be an XY Female.

Would you still change?

Personally, I would do it in a heartbeat.
Happy new years!


in a heart beat....

Offline Paul Muad-Dib

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Re: what if?
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2016, 07:25:25 pm »
Yes.

I don't even know what chromosomes I have right now... that's how much they matter.

Offline arice

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Re: what if?
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2016, 07:40:36 pm »
I would change without a second thought. There are very few incidences where your genotype would be looked at, and give that your body said otherwise, it would probably be written off as an excuse. When I got my first driver's license changed from F to M, all I had to do was to walk in and tell them that when I received the card, the wrong gender had been put on it. They changed it, no questions asked.

Now if you are talking about being born in the appropriate gender, I'd have to think twice. In some ways, it would have made life much easier, but I might not have been the same person. Many of our personality traits come from the trials and tribulations that we go through in life. If I didn't have to go through all that I did, I might not have the empathy I do or some other characteristics.

There is a chance you would never even know that your genotype said you were the opposite gender your body said it was. Other than checking it when you are first born, there wouldn't be much reason to do it.

sam1234
I couldn't agree more. I wouldn't be the same person if I hadn't lived for the past 38 years being perceived as female. I also wouldn't trade my kids and being their mom for anything. As I say, I'm a "guy who happens to be female" and a "guy who is a mom".
I love the dreams when I wake up with a fully functional male body.

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Offline Just Me Here

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Re: what if?
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2016, 12:41:39 pm »
What if, you had one wish and your wish was to the other gender.
And the being giving the wish, could change you but you had to keep your original chromosomes.
So if your XY, you would be an XY Female.

Would you still change?

Personally, I would do it in a heartbeat.
Happy new years!
Technically a phenotypically female individual could have been born like this. In the Y chromosome there is something called the SRY (sex-determining region Y) also called the TDF (testes determining factor). If this is missing the individual will get something called Swyer's syndrome in which they will be genotypically male (XY) but phenotypically female (XX).
The flip side of this is in de la Chapelle (or XX male) syndrome in which one X chromosome has an inserted SRY making them genotypically female (XX) and phenotypically male (XY).

But yes, in the fractured moment of an instant.

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