Author Topic: hate crime on the road/was chased (move if out of place or not needed)  (Read 2201 times)

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Offline laurens_luck

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I am not sure if this should even be on the forum at all, but it seems like the best place to ask for thoughts.

I like driving, and maybe at times a little bit more spirited than some would call ladylike. but hey that's who I am, I like corners, and transgender women have a history in professional motor sport at a higher level than most other sports (Terri O'Connell and Roberta Cowell anyone). but that doesn't seem relevant until I get into the issue.
this means I find myself in countryside roads only slightly away from the main motorway's, where rather, unsavory persons may lurk, as I have found out. now, this has happened before, and because the people who have done this (always more than one in a vehicle, and always look me in the eye and start making threatening gestures immediately) look so plain, the police cannot do anything without license plates, which is a problem because front license plates are not issued where I live. luckily because I am rather fond of these winding roads I manage to find safety in speed (which I do not advise unless you 100% need to in order to keep oneself safe), because of these reoccurring issues I will be taking an advanced driving course tailored to this. however, I would like to prevent this from happening. please note that I am not 100% on anything on weather or not to transition, and live as a male in real life. however two of the three times I have been chased down I had very deliberately styled my hair in a feminine manner (and most of me above the shoulders is hair) and have in the past passed when attempting to try things out so to speak. therefore I am wondering if anybody else here has experienced hate on the open road, and the steps one may take to prevent it? (Please note; my car is a small Coupe  and I am not legally able to do a full tint on any of my windows. so that is not an option).

Offline Dena

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If you are presenting female, the first thing you learn is to avoid places that will get you into trouble. Driving isolated back road that you aren't comfortable on is a bad idea unless you have no other option.

As you are taking an advanced driving corse, you will learn that your car can brake faster than it can accelerate and you may be exposed to such maneuvers such as the boot legged turn which allow you other ways to escape.

Personally, I have never had a problem on the road other than with inattentive driver who like to bump into the back side of my car every so often.
Rebirth Date 1982 - My Transition

Cindy

Hi Lauren,

I drive a sports car with customised number plates "CINDY". I was advised that I was making myself a target for fools, but luckily I have had no bad experiences so far. But I am careful. I know, as all women learn, that I can be a target for predators and I take suitable precautions not to place myself at risk.

Sometimes a dashboard camera can be very useful if you are being targeted by other motorists.

Offline laurens_luck

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thank you both very much for both of your input. you see the biggest problem is the abnormally high murder rate where I live, this also means the violent crime rates are also through the roof. so until I move from the area (which I plan to do), I am pretty much at risk of getting involved in a pursuit with dangerous person(s), especially seeing I live in a rather rural town. however I will take these into account as much as I can.

oh, Cindy, I sometimes have a cheap dash cam up, but the mount on it just cant keep up with me. :icon_lol: I am just not wanting to have a repeat (one of these events actually happened in a very affluent, and well policed suburb), due to lack of police involvement.

so yes, I will keep these in mind.

Offline Serenation

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I love cars and driving also, only issues I get is buying parts, asking for pirelli's at the tyre store and being told to just go with some chinese tyre. Telling mechanic my rear calliper is jamming and have them say, no you just keep leaving the handbrake on dear. I run a dashcam 3m'd to the windshield and a gopro also.

I'm really not understanding what you are getting into, are people road raging at you? and why. at 60mph around a hairpin someone clocks you ?
I will touch a 100 flowers and not pick one.

Offline Beth Andrea

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I drive an old ex-police car which, until recently, was bedecked with a plethora of roses, vines, butterflies and a large trans "rainbow" with "Beth" in cursive on the front fenders...talk about making myself a target!

But in the 4 years it had those decals on, I didn't have a single incident of hostility, in spite of driving in potentially very hostile areas (known skinhead neighborhoods, rural farmland, etc).

Of course, I do not drive aggressively at all. No speeding, no hard turns, etc...I *can* if I need to (lots of driving like that when I was younger  ;) ). I've only experienced a couple of road rage incidents, all after I'd been driving aggressively.

Quote
I like driving, and maybe at times a little bit more spirited than some would call ladylike. but hey that's who I am, I like corners, and transgender women have a history in professional motor sport at a higher level than most other sports (Terri O'Connell and Roberta Cowell anyone). but that doesn't seem relevant until I get into the issue.
this means I find myself in countryside roads only slightly away from the main motorway's, where rather, unsavory persons may lurk, as I have found out. now, this has happened before, and because the people who have done this (always more than one in a vehicle, and always look me in the eye and start making threatening gestures immediately) look so plain, the police cannot do anything without license plates, which is a problem because front license plates are not issued where I live. luckily because I am rather fond of these winding roads I manage to find safety in speed (which I do not advise unless you 100% need to in order to keep oneself safe

This tells me you like to drive aggressively, and you are choosing to look people in the eye once they catch up to you (since your eyes are on the road when on windy roads and when passing cars, right?)

I don't think being trans is the problem here. Many people in the country don't like long-hair types, especially if they're driving anything other than a 4x4. Your "small coupe" may be seen as a "rice burner", and if it's decked out like I'd imagine (low to the ground, loud coffee can muffler), that, combined with what is perceived as aggressive driving (by the other driver, even if it's not seen that way by you) is probably what is triggering their response more than your hairstyle.

Of course, I could be wrong. But given I drive a car that basically screams "hey I'm LGBT!!" and have driven in known hostile areas without issue, suggests your driving style may play a part.

Prevention of an incident is the best answer.
...I think for most of us it is a futile effort to try and put this genie back in the bottle once she has tasted freedom...

--read in a Tessa James post 1/16/2017

Offline Lcleo

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because of these reoccurring issues I will be taking an advanced driving course tailored to this.

I'd take self defense courses if they're trying to make you stop


Offline laurens_luck

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I drive an old ex-police car which, until recently, was bedecked with a plethora of roses, vines, butterflies and a large trans "rainbow" with "Beth" in cursive on the front fenders...talk about making myself a target!

But in the 4 years it had those decals on, I didn't have a single incident of hostility, in spite of driving in potentially very hostile areas (known skinhead neighborhoods, rural farmland, etc).

Of course, I do not drive aggressively at all. No speeding, no hard turns, etc...I *can* if I need to (lots of driving like that when I was younger  ;) ). I've only experienced a couple of road rage incidents, all after I'd been driving aggressively.

This tells me you like to drive aggressively, and you are choosing to look people in the eye once they catch up to you (since your eyes are on the road when on windy roads and when passing cars, right?)

I don't think being trans is the problem here. Many people in the country don't like long-hair types, especially if they're driving anything other than a 4x4. Your "small coupe" may be seen as a "rice burner", and if it's decked out like I'd imagine (low to the ground, loud coffee can muffler), that, combined with what is perceived as aggressive driving (by the other driver, even if it's not seen that way by you) is probably what is triggering their response more than your hairstyle.

Of course, I could be wrong. But given I drive a car that basically screams "hey I'm LGBT!!" and have driven in known hostile areas without issue, suggests your driving style may play a part.

Prevention of an incident is the best answer.
no, my car is not modified in any way. however due to the violence rate and lack of understanding of LGBT people, along side of the only times I have been followed is when attempting to feel feminine, dots are connected. especially given it is a road where the speed limit is too high to safely exceed.

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