Activism and Politics > Discrimination

Need assistance with employment experiences both good and bad

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karenpayneoregon:
On November 7th I will be a key speaker at Microsoft on the topic "Women in Tech". When first asked they wanted me to talk about females in tech. Now they are interested in expanding this topic to LGBT (which I was going to discuss anyways).

What I'm looking for are your experiences both good and bad on the following topics but not exclusive e.g. think of something else I want to hear it along with what area of employment.


* You come out as trans (pre-op) at a current employment, what were the reactions of the company and/or the supervisor
* In your current job after coming out you were demoted and or failed to get raises where they were given before you came out
* Applying for a position as the opposite gender but legally are not that gender. You did this without a current job or with a current job
* Applying for a position (post-op) did not reveal this fact and did not obtain the position with no reason given but was fully qualified for the position
* You lost your job or can't get a job because you are trans and had announced this to the place of employment
* You announced your intentions for gender surgery in one form or another and were denied time off or were let go

karenpayneoregon:
The event was in my mind very successful. After we finished a handful of people came up to me and chatted all in a positive manner.

I was told Microsoft would do an interview with me which happened two days later, will post a link once they have uploaded the interview.

On my blog I received the following comment

Thank you for joining the forum on Sunday night Karen. The group I was with were all very impressed by your willingness to open up and share with the room.

The blog entry was to use as a simple resource for my part in the event.

biannne:
Hi Karen,
I am so glad everything well great for you. But unfortunately your success and story is one of a rare one. In most cases when they find out, they are discriminating. Bigger companies like Apple, Intel and their managers will discriminate you in such away that it is almost impossible to pinpoint to a reason. So you wonder if it was due your transgender.
To completely unrelated story. I work for the largest semiconductor company in the world and when I first moved to Texas from NYC. I was treated differently simply because I was northerner. Now imagine if they find out I am transgender.

Michelle_P:

--- Quote from: biannne on November 14, 2016, 05:08:35 pm ---Hi Karen,
I am so glad everything well great for you. But unfortunately your success and story is one of a rare one. In most cases when they find out, they are discriminating. Bigger companies like Apple, Intel and their managers will discriminate you in such away that it is almost impossible to pinpoint to a reason. So you wonder if it was due your transgender.
To completely unrelated story. I work for the largest semiconductor company in the world and when I first moved to Texas from NYC. I was treated differently simply because I was northerner. Now imagine if they find out I am transgender.

--- End quote ---

I know Apple is quite gender-variant friendly.  An associate transitioned there, and HR brought us in for a bit of diversity training to make darn sure it went smoothly.  I never heard of any issues for her transition.  Several other folks I knew of, but didn't work directly with also transitioned while I was there, but Deb was the one on my mind when I eventually had to make my change.  She was, in many ways, inspirational to me.

If anyone experiences problems with Apple, as an employee or interviewee, they should contact Apple HR with the experience ASAP.  Same goes for customers, contacting Apple Corporate with their experience.  Any hint of intolerance is not going to go over well.

karenpayneoregon:
@Michelle_P I'm not surprised that Apple has this policy (and thanks for sharing), most leaders in technology understand that a transgender person may very well be good fit for a position no different than a cisgender candidate. Many companies are evaluating transgender people the same as cisgender people.

@biannne It's not a perfect world, and admittedly I may very well be a rare case but perhaps it's because of 1. I transitioned at my place of employment after 17 years of good service to the agency rather than coming in from the outside. Another factor was that I transitioned slowly e.g. place a frog in boiling water and it will, if possible jump out while slowly warming the water the frog most likely not notice its in trouble. With that said, I took it slow, wore female jeans to work for about two months, added female shoes for a month or two, had my nails done at an acceptable length with clear nail polish, another month or two my hair was indeed longer etc. So when I announced my transition and real life year nobody was shocked (well except for two people but they came around).
 

One thing I noticed this weekend while waiting to present a topic on street harassment at a local transgender event that the majority of the transgender attendees were dress to impress in a manner not complimentary and may have been because it was a casual event yet at the same time may be not. I see no issues with this but if they happen to do this in an interview it could be detrimental to obtaining a position. There were a handful that dressed to fit in and believe these people (many I talked too) would be gainfully employed and learned that they were indeed employed while many of the others were not employed. My point here is harassment can come from not simply being transgender but how a manager perceives that person as a possible issue were they cause concern in how they dress and disregard their actual talents. 

Bottom line is there is still issues across the country else we would not need to have events such as the inclusion event I spoke at or the event I spoke at this weekend.

 
   

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