Author Topic: Employment Discrimination  (Read 1000 times)

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Offline Draculess

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Employment Discrimination
« on: April 19, 2017, 01:30:06 pm »
So I guess I just want to vent a little about this and give others the space to do the same and relate how they deal with this or advice etc,. Anyway, yeah, ever since I came out as transsexual woman it's been virtually impossible to get hired anywhere. I'm not like horribly unpassable or anything and plenty of the jobs I apply to it wouldn't matter anyhow. I maintained a low-paying job (substantially less than minimum wage) that I got in high school from my ex for quite a while, but I had to leave when I moved. I actually moved from a small rural Illinois town to a place in the suburbs in hopes it would be easier to find a job, but nothing really changed. Then I had to move back anyway.

I haven't legally changed my name yet, so a lot of the time I've presented male in interviews, but this makes me incredibly uncomfortable and doesn't seem to change the response much as I don't really pass as male anyhow, but I did it for a long time because friends and family recommended I do so. If anything I feel like things go over better when I apply with my real name and only give my legal name when it becomes necessary.

I've had a variety of responses. Once this restaurant said they were hiring when we talked on the phone and then when I came in person they said they hadn't been looking for anyone. Most frequently, places just give really evasive answers when I follow up or the interview will go well and then I never hear from them again. They are usually polite and accepting to my face, but it's often very obvious they have no intention to hire me.

One of the most frustrating things about it is that cis people don't remotely comprehend the degree to which this is a problem. They'll flat tell me to get a job like I'm lazy or something when I'm searching for employment fervently. I remember when I first became homeless my friend's mother very condescendingly said I should look into getting a full-time job. I honestly kind of felt like slapping her across the face. Like thanks, Sherlock, I hadn't thought of that. Or they'll talk about how that type of discrimination doesn't exist anymore and how their gay friend has a job ( ::) totally the same thing) and it's illegal for them to discriminate, which of course it is, but that doesn't change the fact they indeed do it. I deeply resent someone telling me about an experience they inherently wouldn't know anything about.

so, yes, the whole situation drives me up the damn wall. I definitely want to leave Illinois, I'm just dealing with some legal stuff currently. what are some of your experiences?

Offline RobynD

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2017, 01:38:01 pm »
Sorry that is happening to you. I've heard others say similar things at times but i have also seen others go on to have great careers. Two thoughts: Try and find other trans folks in business and employ and see if you can get in to their company etc. When all seems hopeless go into your own business or do consulting in your chosen field. If food service is your thing for instance, get a permit to bake and sell cakes and learn how to decorate them etc. A big part of my drive to go freelance which ultimately resulted in my business was because i knew that as i feminized, employers could struggle with it.

English teaching in some countries like China and Japan is almost an assured job if you have any education at all. I knew a guy with a journalism degree that ended up doing it. Some of those countries are friendly or at least accepting to trans people.

I know not everyone sees such solutions as viable, just some thoughts.



Offline Rambler

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2017, 03:49:27 pm »
Try researching companies with LGBT inclusionary policies. Many advertise their policies in the employment section of websites.
Up and away and off I go to lose my mind and find my soul.

Offline DawnOday

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2017, 04:33:01 pm »
What besides your being trans add to your resume? Are you in college? Do your co workers accept you. Are you trying to get a job at one of these companies http://www.hrc.org/resources/best-places-to-work-2017  This list was from the Human Rights Campaign. If a common job. Play up getting along, loving to help people, courtesy, initiative for improvement, highlight responsibility. When fighting for a common job, those not requiring an education. You are competing against many people with the same limited education . When applying for a skilled position you are competing against much fewer applicants. All with bona fides that warrant employment. In these types of jobs you need to focus on teamwork, constant improvement, what you can contribute to the bottom line. Bosses may not understand gender but I guarantee they know about money. Good luck and don't lose hope. What is harder coming out or going to a job interview?
Dawn Oday

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First indication I was different- 1956 kindergarten
First crossdress - Asked mother to dress me in sisters costumes  Age 7
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Offline Sarah leah

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2017, 06:27:06 pm »
This is a hard one honestly as I too just had my job ripped from under me. It is not a lot of fun, nor a great feeling when you are working in an industry that is "meant" to be all inclusive of human diversity. In my case I worked with several Social workers, counselors and welfare workers at an agency that works with a variety of people.

When I started my role I was employed as the Children's Psychotherapist  due to my background and education:

  • Honours 1st class in Social Work
  • Bachelor of Youth Justice
  • Dip. Child Psychology

But more so because I could get children to open up and do so because they trusted me not as the scary professional but because they seen I cared. Because of this my services became in high demand when complex cases could not be resolved. In mid May this year I came out to my team by advising them I was intersex at birth and over the years I had known I wanted to transition. They were all fantastic. However, HR was not so great and two weeks ago they canceled my contract on the grounds of "lack of funding". I knew better and I was able to have the guy in HR state he wanted me to leave as I was a "(sic) <not allowed> tranny"

Now despite my history of success I have had to leave my community of 20 years as I am suddenly having doors slammed in my face. It is a sad thing indeed but I hope as I start to transition this will not be the case. Yet I know deep down I will be forced to start all over again as the new me without my achievements to back me up. So sadly degrees and skills are only a part of the bigger picture.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 08:04:15 pm by Dena »


A straight line may be the shortest distance between two points, but it is by no means the most interesting

Offline DawnOday

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2017, 06:58:12 pm »
This is a hard one honestly as I too just had my job ripped from under me. It is not a lot of fun, nor a great feeling when you are working in an industry that is "meant" to be all inclusive of human diversity. In my case I worked with several Social workers, counselors and welfare workers at an agency that works with a variety of people.

When I started my role I was employed as the Children's Psychotherapist  due to my background and education:

  • Honours 1st class in Social Work
  • Bachelor of Youth Justice
  • Dip. Child Psychology

But more so because I could get children to open up and do so because they trusted me not as the scary professional but because they seen I cared. Because of this my services became in high demand when complex cases could not be resolved. In mid May this year I came out to my team by advising them I was intersex at birth and over the years I had known I wanted to transition. They were all fantastic. However, HR was not so great and two weeks ago they canceled my contract on the grounds of "lack of funding". I knew better and I was able to have the guy in HR state he wanted me to leave as I was a "(sic) <not allowed> tranny"

Now despite my history of success I have had to leave my community of 20 years as I am suddenly having doors slammed in my face. It is a sad thing indeed but I hope as I start to transition this will not be the case. Yet I know deep down I will be forced to start all over again as the new me without my achievements to back me up. So sadly degrees and skills are only a part of the bigger picture.

In 1995 they sent my job of 20 years to Mexico and In 2013 another employer of 10 years sent my job to India. I had lived in California all of my life and ended up having to move to Washington. Boy I am so glad I did. Why can't you take your achievements with you? You earned them.  Here is a list of trans friendly companies. I hope one of them is near you and hiring. http://www.hrc.org/resources/corporate-equality-index-list-of-businesses-with-transgender-inclusive-heal
« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 08:04:51 pm by Dena »
Dawn Oday

It just feels right   :icon_hug: :icon_hug: :icon_kiss: :icon_kiss: :icon_kiss:

First indication I was different- 1956 kindergarten
First crossdress - Asked mother to dress me in sisters costumes  Age 7
First revelation - 1982 to my present wife
First time telling the truth in therapy June 15, 2016
Start HRT Aug 2016
First public appearance 5/15/17




Offline Dena

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2017, 08:12:03 pm »
I understand how much it hurts because I got the ax twice however the law didn't offer any protection so my only option was to move on and get another job. It still happens as the result of ignorance but hopefully the investigation will expose the problem and some good will come out of this.
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Offline Sarah leah

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Re: Employment Discrimination
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2017, 08:11:29 am »
Thank you and sorry I did not think about the swearing part :( will do better next time.


A straight line may be the shortest distance between two points, but it is by no means the most interesting

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