Author Topic: A common misconception about what being transgender is about  (Read 3364 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jessica_Rose

  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 361
  • Reputation: +106/-0
  • Gender: Female
Re: A common misconception about what being transgender is about
« Reply #100 on: December 10, 2017, 09:47:37 pm »
Virginia, I am in a similar situation. My parents are in their mid-80's and are doing reasonably well. I live about 1000 miles away from them and can only visit once or twice a year. Although I call every weekend, they have not seen me since last April.

I would prefer not to upset them, but I feel an obligation to tell them the truth. I plan to visit them in late February or early March and let them know. I have no idea what their reaction may be, but I accept the fact that I may never see them again. I will only ask them not to shun my wife and daughters also.

I have lived with this pain for over 40 years, and I want to spend whatever time I have left as the person I always should have been.
"It is never too late to be what you might have been." - George Eliot
12 Feb 2017 - Out to Wife
23 Mar 2017 - Started Estradiol
28 Jul  2017 - Started Spironolactone
26 Dec 2017 - Out to Daughters
05 Feb 2018 - Legal Name Change
16 Feb 2018 - Out at work / Full Time!



Offline Clara Kay

  • *
  • Posts: 358
  • Reputation: +12/-0
  • Gender: Female
Re: A common misconception about what being transgender is about
« Reply #101 on: December 10, 2017, 11:41:58 pm »
Telling your spouse, children, parents, and siblings is a terrifying experience, and it's not realistic to think that everyone will react positively.  But I've known several trans women who have weathered the experience, and, for the most part, it went better than expected.  Every coming out is unique, of course, but if there are strong bonds and an honest history of love between you and another, the chances for acceptance and even support are good.  Just be ready for the initial shock reaction, some push back, and, if you're like me, a lot of tears.  If things go badly, be patient.  Some will need extra time to decide what's most important to them. 

One bit of advice: Be prepared.  Put your words down on paper first in a letter, even if you don't send or hand it over.  Have some factual information about transgenderism for them to read later.  I like the book by Joanne Herman "Transgender Explained (For Those Who Are Not)"  $15 at Amazon.  Don't get into an argument.  You're purpose is to inform them of your decision and why, not to try to change their minds if they don't accept it. That will come later.

No matter how it goes, you are going to feel better having the weight lifted, and your journey begun.

Online Ryuichi13

  • Work In Progress!
  • Family
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
  • Reputation: +7/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • T, Tea or Tee? (^_~)
Re: A common misconception about what being transgender is about
« Reply #102 on: December 11, 2017, 09:23:56 am »
I have been following this thread since it began, even reading the posts which have since been removed.  And all I can say is I did not choose this.  I was born this way.  I simply decided  after 54 years to stop living the AFAB lie, nothing more.

Good luck with Life, ladies and gentlemen.  We all could use it.

Ryuichi

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk




Tags: