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What are you listening to your music on?

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Jessica_K:
Hi Girls and Guys

I am currently listening to some Sting on my system and was wondering what are others here listening on

So start the ball rolling and without boring details my system is pure analog, vinyl, all valve (vacuum tube) amplification and floor standing speakers

Jessica xx

CynthiaAnn:
Hi Jessica, sounds like you have a nice audio system there. I have a few turn tables here (German dual) and solid state stereo (Yamaha) floor standing speakers. I also have tube audio amps for guitars (they work great for reproducing), and all manners of speakers and such. We have a 1958 classic "Hi Fi" here made by Hoffman (tube), it's like a piece of furniture with beautiful wood cabinets (2), with FM / AM tuner and Gerrard turn table that plays our 78's  :) Mostly however I listen to music when I am at the computer here in head phones (always over ear). It keeps me sane, when I have to work, like this morning.... (I am on call).

Enjoy the Sting (he is great) Jessica

Cynthia -

Shay9999:
I'm lame. Earbuds with my phone, or my computer. My computer has a television screen as the display, so the audio from it is about as decent as televisions can get. I used to have a really nice sound system where I could feel the bass in my feet, but I had to lose it when I moved out of my house. Back with the family, have to be extra quiet.  :-\

AnneK:

--- Quote ---pure analog, vinyl, all valve (vacuum tube)
--- End quote ---

Why do so many prefer distorted music?  When you consider turntable rumble, microphonics, surface hiss, frequency and dynamic range limitation, vacuum tube thermal noise and more, by the time you get through your analog system, you've added a lot of noise and distortion to the sound.  The best vinyl cab produce about 65 dB of dynamic range, compared to 96 dB for CD quality.  That's over 1000x the range, from softest to loudest, of vinyl.  Also, due to inertia in the cutting lathe and pickup needle, you get nowhere near the frequency range of CDs, that can approach 22 KHz in some systems.  Please note, I am not talking about compressed formats, such as MP3, which tend to be "lossy" and lose some detail.

I also recall the direct to disk and 1/2 & 1/4 speed masters, of many years ago, to get around the limitations of vinyl.  Of course, we can't forget about tape hiss and wow & flutter, when talking about analog master tapes.

There's a term called "transfer function", which compare s the input and output for fidelity.  Many years ago, a manufacturer of transistor amps created one with the same transfer function as a tube amp.  The audio purists couldn't tell the difference.  Now, amps built with bipolar transistors, as earlier ones were, will tend to generate odd order harmonics, compared with the even order with vacuum tubes.  Even order tend to be more pleasant to listen to than odd order.  However, later amps are built with some type of FET transistor, which has similar characteristics to vacuum tubes and therefore create similar even order harmonics.

I am also aware that in the early days of transistor apps, some things were done that did cause unwanted artifacts.  This might have been the cause of people preferring tube amps as, back in that day, they were better.


At the moment, I'm listening to some MP3s on my tablet, but that's only casual listening.  If I want to really listen to music, I put on CDs on my main system.  Incidentally, I have both vinyl & CD of much of my music.  There's no way the vinyl is as good as CD.  The laws of physics, etc., get in the way.

CynthiaAnn:

--- Quote from: AnneK on May 28, 2019, 12:15:14 pm ---I also recall the direct to disk and 1/2 & 1/4 speed masters, of many years ago, to get around the limitations of vinyl. 

--- End quote ---

I have Boston's first album on half speed mastered vinyl, cost a bit more back then.

Of course dynamic range of digitally mastered music is way better today, but back in the 70's that vinyl kicked some serious booty, it still does (for certain things). There is a resurgence of vinyl collectors today, especially 20 somethings...

C -

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