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Coronavirus?

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davina61:
Open mic night in the pub, apart from 2 folk coming from restaurant to use the rest room nobody was wearing a mask and it was crowded like pre covid

ChrissyRyan:
Be safe and careful.  Do not take COVID-19 lightly.


Chrissy

Battle Goddess:
Here's a recent article from the WaPo by a professor at UCSF. Says it's free to the public; no telling how long it'll be up.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/delta-variant-vaccines-work/2021/07/08/de2c480c-df7e-11eb-ae31-6b7c5c34f0d6_story.html

One key message I take is to expect the Virus to remain among us indefinitely. Fortunately, we as a species won't be as immunologically naïve as we were two years ago. This is much what happened with the 1918 pandemic flu. Its descendants are still with us, but humans have been exposed to them for over a century now and tend not to die as much.

(Sort of in the same vein, I watched an episode about polio on that PBS documentary series American Experience the other week. It said that polio became such an awful disease in the early part of the twentieth century because of the hygiene movement two generations prior. When people started rigorously disinfecting their houses, their children had maternal poliovirus antibodies but grew up without much being exposed to poliovirus in the home, so their own immune systems never learned to produce poliovirus antibodies themselves. These children grew up, and when they started having babies, the mothers couldn't pass polio antibodies to their own babies. Ended up with a couple of generations of kids without any natural immunity to poliovirus until Salk and Sabin came along. I always learn something from that show!)

There are some fine points in the article about testing that I'm not sure I understand because I thought I'd heard other public health officials make contrary statements, but I wouldn't be surprised if I'm misunderstanding things. They're the experts; I'm just a humble data gal.

Article also has a nuance about PCR machines themselves I'd never seen. Has anyone else?

barbie:
Today, about 1.3 million people got a shot in S. Korea, the greatest daily number so far. I was one of them, and it was the second of Moderna.

https://ourworldindata.org/explorers/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&facet=none&pickerSort=desc&pickerMetric=population&Metric=People+vaccinated&Interval=Cumulative&Relative+to+Population=true&Align+outbreaks=false&country=JPN~KOR~AUS~NZL~TWN~USA~BRA~SGP~DEU~GBR

The vaccination started very slowly here because of the lack of vaccine supply, but it is now catching up. Still, the maximum number of guests per table allowed in restaurants and bars is 2 in the evening. With the people fully vaccinated, the allowed maximum number is 4.

S. Korea has never imposed lockdown, but now I think a nationwide total lockdown would be better and more efficient because the government has imposed restrictions selectively based on ad hoc criteria, and the most damaged people have been the self-employed, especially the owners of restaurants and bars. It was not equal or fair at all. Sometimes, totalitarianism works better.

I am technically a government employee, and I have got virtually no economic impact from the covid-19. I am a little bit sorry for the self-employed people here.

The government says we may be able to start living with the covid-19 in November when the ratio of fully-vaccinated people reaches 70%.

barbie~~

Haley Conner:
Yesterday, millions of Americans lost unemployment aid, and we're still seeing surges in the infection rates.  It's not a good recipe.  Within the last week, 3 out of 7 of my pandemic social group caught the delta variant.  It's fairly depressing.  Good to see you're still around.  I was beginning to wonder.

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