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Coronavirus?

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Angelaney:

--- Quote from: barbie on September 07, 2021, 10:50:11 am ---The vaccination started very slowly here because of the lack of vaccine supply, but it is now catching up.

--- End quote ---

Unfortunately many of the vaccine supply issues came about because of the EU behaving like children in the wake of Brexit, they were blocking exports of the AZ vaccine from Europe to places like Australia.

There had been a deal to supply x number of vaccines to Europe but because the media had wiped out almost half of AstraZenecas share price with scaremongering and nobody in Europe wanted the vaccine, AZ started shipping to other countries instead, and so the EU blocked those exports and stock piled millions of vaccines with no intention of using them.

The overall effect is what's important and nearly 1/3 of the total vaccine supply was sitting in storage when it should have been making it's way to countries that needed it.

As a former EU citizen i'm thoroughly ashamed of what has happened, and I can't imagine how many people have lost loved ones as a result of all this.

Battle Goddess:
Here's a new article from the WaPo. It doesn't say it's being made free for everyone, so no promises it will open.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/interactive/2021/1-in-500-covid-deaths/?itid=hp-top-table-main


The upshot if it doesn't open: one American in 500 is now dead of Covid. That seems like a whole lot of people to me, and it only took us a year and a half. I'm very sad.

"At a certain point, it was no longer a matter of whether the United States would reach the gruesome milestone of 1 in 500 people dying of Covid-19, but a matter of when. A year? Maybe 15 months? The answer: 19 months.

Given the mortality rate from Covid and our nation’s population size, “we’re kind of where we predicted we would be with completely uncontrolled spread of infection,” said Jeffrey D. Klausner, clinical professor of medicine, population and public health sciences at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine."


In my town of roughly 50,000 people, 1 person in 500 equates to roughly 100 people. Put it that way and it doesn't sound like a lot, does it? Surely we can spare that many and still get by. Probably just a bunch of old folks. We can handle that, right? Town would still function. Right? Right?

Uh-huh.

But what if you looked at Covid as a lottery, and everyone in town was forced to buy a ticket? No, even better - what if you didn't necessarily have to buy a ticket? What if having to buy a ticket was the first round of the mandatory lottery, and there were ways of lowering your odds of having to buy one? Then the second round would be for ticketholders to see who actually has to die. 100 spins, 100 tickets, 100 lives, 100 deaths. One person in five hundred.

And don't forget the roving street gangs who come to your door and thrust a ticket into your hands no matter what. They say they have a right to. It's their bodies. No give-backs!


I'd move out of town, is what I'd do. Only a darn fool idjit town holds a lottery like that, and that one has a h*ll of a gang problem, to boot.

But no, I won't. Stupidtown my country may be, but I gotta have hope. The USA swings from crisis to crisis, moral panic to moral panic, obnoxious fad to obnoxious fad, and somehow it staggers forward and remains (mostly) upright. I'm here until the bitter end.

After that? Glad I speak Italian.

Rachel Montgomery:
1 in 500 is bad, but it is nothing compared to the dire predictions at the outset.  They were actually giving stats at first that if they had played out would equate to 1 in 180 by the end of last year.  So, bad as it is, we have dealt with it better than was predicted.  The vaccines were available faster than most imagined.  No one knows how many lives the vaccines may have saved, but there is evidence it would be worse without them.

Battle Goddess:

--- Quote from: Rachel Montgomery on September 15, 2021, 11:06:22 pm ---1 in 500 is bad, but it is nothing compared to the dire predictions at the outset.  They were actually giving stats at first that if they had played out would equate to 1 in 180 by the end of last year.  So, bad as it is, we have dealt with it better than was predicted.  The vaccines were available faster than most imagined.  No one knows how many lives the vaccines may have saved, but there is evidence it would be worse without them.

--- End quote ---

Quite true, Rachel. I remember the direst predictions from Hopkins back in March 2020 running upwards of a couple million dead. Those were the numbers that convinced the administration back then to issue the national lockdown.

Gee whiz, that was a weird time, wasn't it? I live near a major airport, and it was so strange not to see airliners all the time. The skies felt like they did back on 9/11. And remember how empty the roads were? I could get anywhere easily, but there was nowhere to go. (Except... the grocery store!  :P )

Of course, two million is a Big Scary Number, and it came from running one model among many, and those were early days with sparse data, so you knew it wasn't as accurate as later models with better data would be. (I saw an interview with Robert Redfield, CDC director at the time, who said that his counterpart in China thought he was seeing mortality as high as ten percent very early on!) So we really didn't know a whole ton yet. I think two million was probably an extreme prediction, but even one million deaths would have been too many. So would half a million.

Thank goodness for science, scientists, and vaccines. For thoughtful medical personnel, too, who have learned how to lower mortality rates for those of us who suffer from Covid.

If anyone thought that vaccines didn't work, we're running a huge experiment right now with a test group of millions of vaccinated folks and a control group of millions of unvaccinated folks. They aren't randomly selected, they aren't matched by cohort or possible independent variables, and it hasn't been enough time to study them longitudinally, but dash it all - when you see that hospitals are overwhelmed with folks who never got a vaccine for whatever reason, and when it comes to a point that Idaho is issuing statewide medical rationing ("'Someone who is otherwise healthy and would recover more rapidly may get treated or have access to a ventilator before someone who is not likely to recover,' the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare said in a statement explaining the system"), I'd say the results of the experiment are savagely, savagely clear.

Like you say, Rachel, it feels so awful to say that only losing as many Americans last Thursday as we lost on 9/11 is a relief, but, well, thank goodness we only lost as many Americans last Thursday as we lost on 9/11.

barbie:
Here the media reports that several self-employed people committed suicide because of economic loss from the covid-19 regulations. Some people blame the government. Actually, the number of deaths from suicide is greater by a factor of 10 than that from the covid-19 here (>20,000 vs. 2,386 since Feb 15, 2020).

Next week is a kind of thanksgiving holiday here, and the government says the share of people with at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine reaches 70% today, which was the initial goal. But news around the world says that vaccines are not so effective in preventing the spread of the delta variant as shown in Israel and Singapore.

The government plans to relax the regulations once the share of people fully vaccinated reaches 70% in late October or early November.

Pandemic will not end for anyone until it ends for everyone.

barbie~~

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