Author Topic: Discrimination in Healthcare  (Read 2560 times)

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Offline Lady Sarah

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2020, 11:11:08 am »


  Don't give up on finding the right therapist and getting your final surgery, with Covid I wonder if you can achieve this with virtual visits?
NYC Nurse

My insurance will pay for virtual visits as of January, 2021 due to Covid-19.  This would come in handy, since there are no therapists with that specialty within a 3 hour drive.
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Offline ChrissyRyan

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2021, 11:09:52 am »
I have never had any bad experiences with health care professionals, for any reason.

I sympathize though to all who have had bad experiences.

Now I do remember having to wait a few months to get an appointment but that I do not consider to be a bad experience.  It is just something I endured.  Good things are worth waiting for!

Chrissy
Be a good example of good behavior.  Always be kinder than needed.  Be tender to others.  You are as beautiful as the thoughts you think and the words that you speak.   Always stay cheerful, be polite, kind, and understanding.  Knowledge and action shown without love is not impressive.  If you look for the good in people you will find it. Healthy relationships are so important to good living.  Serve others.

Good living, joy, unity, love, and happiness can come from following these practices: Never let selfishness or conceit motivate you.  Regard others as more important than yourself.  Do not limit attention to only your interests, but include the interests of others

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Offline KateR

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2021, 11:01:13 pm »
Yeah I finally found it big time!!!!


I can’t get a Covid vaccination in Oklahoma because I’m trans.

Like my spouse I qualify for phase 2 (currently eligible) for a shot in Oklahoma.

She has been allowed to receive her shots.  The only difference is that I honestly identified as Trans.  The state won’t allow me to schedule for a shot.  Obviously they want me to die.


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Kate

Offline OzChick

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2021, 09:03:56 pm »
Hi NYC Nurse,

I've only just joined yesterday so my comment is coming a little late. I live in Australia and I do anything I can to conceal my trans identity from any but my most trusted medical providers due to a history of mistreatment. As background, I'm 51 years old and I look cis so I usually don't have any trouble.

The harassment that I have experienced from medical practitioners has ranged from malicious misgendering, deadnaming through to open abuse. The worst was when I broke my toe. I went to my doctor (GP - super trans friendly) and received excellent care. He referred me to the hospital emergency department and Iwas receiving medical care there when the emergency doctor requested an xray to confirm that it was indeed a break. While being xrayed the radiographer noted gender based inconsistencies in my records and asked me about them. I was not as on guard as usual since I had already been given some pain releif by my GP (the green whistle) and just replied that I was trans and that the documentation needed to be updated as all my documents were accurate to my new gender and name.

About 15 mins later it was confirmed that I had a break and the emergency doctor prescribed pain relief which was to be administered by two nurses. The nurses approached me (and my partner of 22 years) and spoke loudly to each other asking if 'that was it?' pointing to me and then they went on to taunt me about being trans while withholding the pain meds. My partner had to argue with them to get them to release the meds to me and then they wouldn't give them to me but gave them to my partner because they 'didn't want to touch it' (me). We left as soon as we could and then a few days later lodged a complaint which the hospital said they couldn't follow up because I didn't give names. I think they could have looked up the rosters and the lists they keep of who administed what medicines to whom.

Another time, earlier in my transition, one of my children was persistently bed wetting. This later turned out to be connected with her autism undiagnosed at the time. When my partner took her to the doctor he said that 'he was not surpised because he had met the father' (me) and told my partner to leave me for the benefit of the children. What he said was morally wrong and medically incorrect. It had nothing to do with my parenting.

I could go on and on but that's the flavour of it.

I now have an excellent psychiatris, endocrinologist and an amazing GP. The first time I went to my GP I had to disclose to receive the care I needed. When I did that in past, even if the doctor was not discriminatory, I ended up informing them about my medical care and needs. My GP just said he didn't know, rescheduled the appointment for a weeks time, didn't charge me and when I returned he was a walking encyclopeadia on trans health (Omfg! I hit the jackpot!). He's been fantastic ever since. He told me that if I was anywhere away from him (interstate) and needed scripts etc then he would do a phone consult for me and issue the scripts electronically so that I would have to go through my story with another GP.

During COVID I was terrified of, not dying, but being isolated from my partner's protection away from my family and at the mercy of medical staff due to being COVID positive. They would find out that I am pre-op (I'm going to organise to have surgery over the next year) and I am confident that they would torment me. I'm going to have surgery soon for me, because I need to and a welcome side effect will be that I'll be able to protect myself in a situation like that.

In summary, with my trusted, established medical care I do super well and I'm very lucky. Outside of that I see most medical practitioners as a threat until proven otherwise.

kind regards

OzChick

Offline Peeptoe

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2021, 01:18:38 am »


About 15 mins later it was confirmed that I had a break and the emergency doctor prescribed pain relief which was to be administered by two nurses. The nurses approached me (and my partner of 22 years) and spoke loudly to each other asking if 'that was it?' pointing to me and then they went on to taunt me about being trans while withholding the pain meds. My partner had to argue with them to get them to release the meds to me and then they wouldn't give them to me but gave them to my partner because they 'didn't want to touch it' (me). We left as soon as we could and then a few days later lodged a complaint which the hospital said they couldn't follow up because I didn't give names. I think they could have looked up the rosters and the lists they keep of who administed what medicines to whom.
I come from a very homophobic society, but that is just horrendous. I would expect that from older generation and not from medical personnel. Sorry to hear.

Offline OzChick

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2021, 01:43:48 am »
Hi Peeptoe

Yeah, it wasn't very nice. I suppose over time I've just supressed memories like these which kind of internalises them. I think I've become hard to it. I've become hard. I've learned not to tell people about a lot of my experiences because it upsets them so much. I did tell a trusted friend and he started to shed tears for me. I felt awkward and really awful to make him feel so sad but I was touched by his reaction; it was so unexpected. It really took me by surprise. He was the last person I told. My psych knows, my partner and my GP. I don't even really tell people about my attitudes towards medical staff because they look at me like I'm exagerating. My GP was furious when he found out. I'm very reserved around people generally I think as a form of self protection.

What you said means a lot to me. This is the first time I've really told anyone about this in my community...so publicly. Its really not ok is it? The nurses only knew because of the paperwork glitch. If it wasn't for that I would have been fine.

regards

OzChick

Offline Peeptoe

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2021, 03:15:11 am »
OzChick, oh well, i guess people get used to everything.. just from the perspective of another human being, i myself have at least two upcoming surgeries, and i just don't want to imagine finding myself in a similar situation.

Offline OzChick

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Re: Discrimination in Healthcare
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2021, 03:17:17 am »
I hope it never happens to you or anyone. Good luck with your surgeries. I’m looking to book mine myself. 😘

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