Community Conversation > Real-Life Experience

Real Life Experience as a Prerequisite for Surgery

(1/13) > >>

Oldandcreaky:
When I transitioned, a year of successfully living in your new role was a prerequisite for gender affirming surgery. I think this is prudent simply because it gives you a good, long trial of the trials of transitioning. For most transitioners, there is good marbled with bad. A year-long trial gives you more data to decide whether you're willing to pay the costs for the pleasures. It also lets you ascertain whether you can make a living in your new role.

What do you think?

Devlyn:
The old standards were horrible; it was essentially a beauty pageant with only the winners being approved for surgery. Thankfully the WPATH Standards of Care have evolved over time with a realisation that there are more than two flavours of people in the world.

Rationale for a preoperative, 12-month experience of living in an identity-congruent gender role:

The criterion noted above for some types of genital surgeries - i.e., that patients engage in 12 continuous months of living in a gender role that is congruent with their gender identity- is based on expert clinical consensus that this experience provides ample opportunity for patients to experience and socially adjust in their desired gender role, before undergoing irreversible surgery. As noted in section VII, the social aspects of changing one's gender role are usually challenging - often more so than the physical aspects. Changing gender role can have profound personal and social consequences, and the decision to do so should include an awareness of what the familial, interpersonal, educational, vocational, economic, and legal challenges are likely to be, so that people can function successfully in their gender role. Support from a qualified mental health professional and from peers can be invaluable in ensuring a successful gender role adaptation (Bockting, 2008).

The duration of 12 months allows for a range of different life experiences and events that may occur throughout the year (e.g., family events, holidays, vacations, season-specific work or school experiences). During this time, patients should present consistently, on a day-to-day basis and across all settings of life, in their desired gender role. This includes coming out to partners, family, friends, and community members (e.g., at school, work, other settings).

Health professionals should clearly document a patient's experience in the gender role in the medical chart, including the start date of living full time for those who are preparing for genital surgery. In some situations, if needed, health professionals may request verification that this criterion has been fulfilled: They may communicate with individuals who have related to the patient in an identity-congruent gender role, or request documentation of a legal name and/or gender marker change, if applicable.


Pammie:

--- Quote from: Oldandcreaky on May 06, 2021, 03:32:35 pm ---When I transitioned, a year of successfully living in your new role was a prerequisite for gender affirming surgery. I think this is prudent simply because it gives you a good, long trial of the trials of transitioning. For most transitioners, there is good marbled with bad. A year-long trial gives you more data to decide whether you're willing to pay the costs for the pleasures. It also lets you ascertain whether you can make a living in your new role.

What do you think?

--- End quote ---
I agree entirely and I’d probably add that, as a community we do ourselves no good by demanding all checks are removed. The stupid “concerns” of the transphobic are all about men just deciding to be a woman so that they can go a ladies bathroom. This agenda feeds into that for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

pamelatransuk:
Absolutely Devlyn. I agree completely.

Hugs

Pamela xx

Karen_A:

--- Quote from: Oldandcreaky on May 06, 2021, 03:32:35 pm ---When I transitioned, a year of successfully living in your new role was a prerequisite for gender affirming surgery.

--- End quote ---
Mostly still true when I went full time in 1997.


--- Quote --- I think this is prudent simply because it gives you a good, long trial of the trials of transitioning.

--- End quote ---

Either way there is really no going back to life you had 'before' IMO... If one detransitioned after a year, if you stayed where you were, people will see you as even more "different" and your relations both at work and personal will not be as they were before that transition for the most part I think.

So in that sense it's not  really like test driving a car! ;)

But if one detransitions, one could move and start over where people never new you detransioned I guess.



--- Quote --- A year-long trial gives you more data to decide whether you're willing to pay the costs for the pleasures. It also lets you ascertain whether you can make a living in your new role.

--- End quote ---

IMO neither one is necessarily true. First many of us have a hard time really blending well, at least initially, so that year for many is likely not to be representative of the rest their lives.

Even if blending is not an issue, some may lose everything (not as many now as in the past) and it often takes longer than a year to rebuild a life...

In terms of a job, if one transitions in place and your employer accepts it, if you eventually get laid off and don't blend well, getting another equivalent job may be very difficult, depending on both one's industry and geographical location.

For transitioning in place, one year is not very indicative of other jobs if you keep your pre-transition one.


--- Quote ---What do you think?

--- End quote ---

Even though I think for many it's not a great indication of what the rest of life would be like, if one is NOT willing to live full time for one year before surgery, than I think one is  not motivated/committed enough or sure enough of who they are to have irreversible surgery... SRS is not something to be done lightly IMO...

I think one year of RLT is a reasonable prerequisite for SRS.

-Karen

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version