Author Topic: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope  (Read 3568 times)

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soldierjane

Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« on: November 22, 2008, 01:34:44 pm »
When I started HRT at 25 I thought "I will have an orchi at around 26-28 and GRS has to happen like, around 30 or before". So time passed and I spent the next five years solving other big problems in my life (which I thought I'd have solved before 30 and which dragged way too long), problems that costed me money I didn't have. Long story short, I eventually came to the decision that I'd forgo the orchiectomy and aim straight for GRS. It didn't happen. It's just too much money.
 
So now I'm coming again a couple of years later to the idea of, well, having an orchiectomy (so I can stop taking spiro) and it feels like a defeat.
 
For those that had an orchiectomy, regardless of whether GRS has happened or not, does it actually feel like you're doing something, putting yourself further along the path? I'm afraid that it won't make much of a difference and that it will feel like settling.
 
 
(Apologies for the whiny parts)

Renee

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2008, 04:43:05 pm »
I got my orchi 18 months ago and do not regret it a bit. The effects take about 6 months to notice but then it takes over pretty fast. First your sex drive disapears ( hrt for 3 years ) and then your body starts to transform. For me at 40 I lost 90% of my body hair and had major changes in my face and overall body shape. I already had breast implants but still experianced more fullness and 1/2 cup size increase. Now when I go anywhere even in male clothes no makeup I still get addressed as female so yes I would recomend it.
 
Renee

KarenLyn

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2008, 07:05:17 pm »
Everyone is different so it really comes down to what you feel you need to do. I had all the same results Renee had with just HRT. I'll pass on the orchi and wait for GRS.  My suggestion is to make a list of what you feel are important pro and con and see how it works out.
 
Karen Lyn

Offline HelenW

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Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2008, 08:24:25 pm »
I had my orchiectomy done last December because the spiro was damaging my kidneys.  I'm not sorry I had it done, I'm just sorry I didn't have the funds for a full vaginoplasty at the time.

The changes you will experience after an orchiectomy will depend as much on your genetics as on the amount of spironolactone you are taking.  My libido actually increased a bit after my operation, I assume this happened because the spiro was depressing the use of all the testosterone in my body.  Afterwards, since I stopped taking the spiro, my body's T level went up from what was being produced in my adrenal glands, to the level that a natal female would have.

It's certainly not a defeat, though, it's just a stopgap measure to reduce the amount of meds you are taking.  SRS is still an option that can be pursued.

Btw, I had a "radical orchiectomy" done - the incisions are in my abdomen above the penis, not in the scrotum.  I paid more to have it done that way so there would be no scar tissue in the scrotal tissues to hinder my SRS at a future date.  There's no need to give up hope!

hugs & smiles,
Emelye
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The Bri Girl

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2008, 09:06:16 pm »
Oh I'm so, so glad this topic was brought up!
I'm 36, I'm fighting to find someone who will prescribe HRT, and as I'm on disability my hopes are low that I'll ever be able to afford an srs before I'm 80....
     But I might be able to convince someone to help me get an Orchi, and I think it's possible to finance that.  But I've wondered how that would work out.  I was afraid it might not have the feminizing effect I am so desprate for.  Hearing from you girls has given me some new wind in my sails.
Yay!
-Bri

The Bri Girl

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2008, 09:07:11 pm »
Oh, yeah, and with the psychotropics and diabetes I have, it might be a safer route than spiro I'd guess.

Chrissty

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2008, 04:06:05 am »
One Bio that always stays in my mind, is that of a professional dancer who opted for an orchi rather than SRS bcause of concerns over losing valuable time (and possibly flexibility) in her dancing career.
 
From this I have sort of assumed that without the "boys" down there, "interesting" tucking methods may also be employed. :icon_wink:
 
So I guess what I am saying is, that there may be more benfits from this procedure than first imagined.
 
Chrissty   

Offline Sandy

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Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2008, 08:16:29 am »
For those that had an orchiectomy, regardless of whether GRS has happened or not, does it actually feel like you're doing something, putting yourself further along the path? I'm afraid that it won't make much of a difference and that it will feel like settling.

It's not whiny at all Jane.  Life throws folks like us a whole lot of curves.

Anyway, I had my orchi about a year before my GRS and the primary reason I did it was because I *needed* to take a positive, permanent, irreversible step in my progress.

I was not sure at that time if I would ever have GRS so I wanted to be able to drop or eliminate my spiro.  And I wanted to know that I had not only crossed a bridge, but burned it behind me as well.  I felt that despite being on HRT which had effectively chemically castrated me, I still had two shrivelled reminders there as a reminder of my past.  And while some of the changes I had been through had already become irreversible, I felt that if I stopped HRT could possibly go back to pretending to be a guy.  So in some respects I felt I was pretending to be a girl.

The orchi affirmed to me I was no longer pretending.  I could *never* go back.

It was a very positive step for me.  It finally put to rest the persona of the guy I had been pretending to be.  Check out my blog on it in "Sandy's Transition" https://www.susans.org/forums/index.php/topic,13143.0.html.

Good luck!

-Sandy
Out of the darkness, into the light.
Following my bliss.
I am complete...

soldierjane

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2008, 09:14:49 am »
Thanks everyone for the great replies. I feel much better today and more able to sort the good from the bad, I also had a great day with my boyfriend so that probably helped too :)
Sometimes those little signature GRS tickers on the forum can be a painful reminder I guess, of the enormous difficulty of attaining some things. Not that I'd like anyone to remove them.
 
Like someone mentioned, I'll start seeing orchiectomy as a sort of health measure, to avoid prolonged exposure to spiro. Still hard to get excited by it, kinda like being excited about getting a very expensive tetanus shot, but I guess I'll live, and living is good  :)

Janet_Girl

Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2008, 10:00:21 pm »
Thanks everyone for the great replies. I feel much better today and more able to sort the good from the bad, I also had a great day with my boyfriend so that probably helped too :)
Sometimes those little signature GRS tickers on the forum can be a painful reminder I guess, of the enormous difficulty of attaining some things. Not that I'd like anyone to remove them.
 
Like someone mentioned, I'll start seeing orchiectomy as a sort of health measure, to avoid prolonged exposure to spiro. Still hard to get excited by it, kinda like being excited about getting a very expensive tetanus shot, but I guess I'll live, and living is good  :)

I agree Jane, hence my list of "Girls I am so jealous of".  I am at a point that I too need to do something that is positive.  Kaiser, my insurance will not pay for an orchiectomy, unless it is required for health reasons.  So I am looking into paying for it myself.  GRS is so far away a this point I need to do something that is for my soul.

Offline Morena1989

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Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2019, 05:42:49 pm »
Hello I was going through the same thing where all my research was telling me I needed to stop testosterone before 35 by either orchiectomy or grs surgery…well a couple years into my 30’s life happened I had been on hormones for 10 years had my breasts done and full facial feminization by dr Harrison lee himself I had been putting off orchiectomy and was gonna go straight to grs surgery but my weight wasn’t perfect so I finally just scheduled it and had it done about a month ago.i have to say it feels great my anxiety is gone and my entire outlook on life has changed. I know because I’ve been on hormones for 10 years it’ll be awhile to notice any major physical changes but mentally and emotionally I feel so much better. Also my sex drive hasn’t diminished as much as they said but again I just had it done and I’ve been taking estrogen and spiro for years. I definitely do not regret it I also had it done by the great dr McGinn in new hope she’s a great person and I intend to go back to her for grs surgery.

Offline KimOct

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Re: Orchiectomy and the threshold of hope
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2019, 04:37:52 am »
I had an orchiectomy 2 years ago, for me it allowed me to get my birth certificate changed.  Each state is different but it qualified as GCS so that was my favorite part.  As far as my body my skin softened dramatically, my body hair has decreased significantly - not gone but manageable - I shave it once a month.  My breasts have developed somewhat.  I am on 1/3 the usual E dose because of health reasons.  In short I am glad I did it.  But you should have reasonable expectations.  It is a noticeable but not dramatic difference.

I kept the scrotum in case I do get a vaginoplasty because that is what forms the labia.  I had a chat with Marci Bowers when she visited the university that I had my therapy and surgery.  Her opinion is that even though that is what she does for a living in her words 'a vagina doesn't make you a woman - you already are that.  A vagina is for sex"  Not my words rather hers.  I was a little surprised by that coming from her.

The pain and recovery time is manageable.  I recommend staying at home 3 days and the soreness was gone in about 10 days - at least that was my experience.
The first transphobe you have to conquer is yourself

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