Author Topic: UK language  (Read 1313 times)

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Offline Jessica

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Offline SarahEL

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Re: UK language
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2020, 03:47:31 pm »
Thanks for posting, I'll read it when I finish my cuppa and biscuit whilst sitting under the brolly ...... :)

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Offline Devlyn

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Re: UK language
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2020, 04:13:32 pm »
I'm going to pootle over to our allotment and read this. It's just a bog standard list of phrases, innit?
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Offline AnneK

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Re: UK language
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2020, 09:51:19 pm »
Yeah, I wish they'd learn to speak English over there!   :D

Over the years I've watched a lot of British TV shows and often wondered what the heck they were saying.   ;)
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Offline Jenny_Oh

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Re: UK language
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2020, 10:30:06 pm »
For those that scratch their heads at UK phrases
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Offline Pica Pica

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Re: UK language
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2021, 03:53:26 pm »
I am delighted there's a whole board for people who speak English proper like what I do.
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Offline Angelaney

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Re: UK language
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2021, 04:04:25 pm »
Some of that is universal, but most of it is London English, and London is nothing like the rest of the UK (thank god) :p

Offline Sephirah

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Re: UK language
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2021, 04:08:53 pm »
I am delighted there's a whole board for people who speak English proper like what I do.

Wow, there's a blast from the past. Good to hear from you again, hon! *hugs*

LOL! I use the term "faffing" rather a lot in day to day life. If something is needlessly complicated, it's a lot of "faffing around!"

Offline pamelatransuk

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Re: UK language
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2021, 03:09:22 pm »
Hello Everyone

It is quite interesting that we have in UK as pointed out by Angelaney some phrases familiar to most of UK and some familiar to regions only.

It is extraordinary that we have in UK so many regional accents for a country so small by land mass.

Perhaps it is expected certain UK words are unknown to US citizens and certain US words are unknown to UK citizens. Just wish to mention a couple of food terms for amusement.
1. I recall on this website a British lady referring to dining out and enjoying Gammon which is apparently unfamiliar to Americans.
2. When visiting US and dining out, I had no idea what Beets were and agreed to sample them only to discover we have it here but call it Beetroot.

Hugs

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Offline Sephirah

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Re: UK language
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2021, 03:35:39 pm »
It is extraordinary that we have in UK so many regional accents for a country so small by land mass.

Yup, it is.

This video is quite enlightening. Although even I, born in England, can't understand a word some of the speakers are saying. No wonder Americans need subtitles in some movies.


Offline ChrissyRyan

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Re: UK language
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2021, 05:38:16 pm »
Is the phrase “toodle loo” still used as saying goodbye?
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Offline Sephirah

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Re: UK language
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2021, 06:20:52 pm »
Is the phrase “toodle loo” still used as saying goodbye?

Yes, hahahaha. I know several older people who still say it. As well as "Toodle pip." Both work.

Offline ChrissyRyan

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Re: UK language
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2021, 06:55:02 pm »
Yes, hahahaha. I know several older people who still say it. As well as "Toodle pip." Both work.

Heard that somewhere, must have been during a movie. 

Chrissy
Be a good example of good behavior.  Always be kinder than needed.  Be tender to others.  You are as beautiful as the thoughts you think and the words that you speak.   Always stay cheerful, be polite, kind, and understanding.  Knowledge and action shown without love is not impressive.  If you look for the good in people you will find it. Healthy relationships are so important to good living.  Serve others.

Good living, joy, unity, love, and happiness can come from following these practices: Never let selfishness or conceit motivate you.  Regard others as more important than yourself.  Do not limit attention to only your interests, but include the interests of others

It is not usually about how fast you transition, it is about how well you transition.  

Offline Carla68

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Re: UK language
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2021, 09:10:54 am »
Heard that somewhere, must have been during a movie. 

Chrissy

Sadly that was probably Dick van Dyke in Mary Poppins
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Offline Carla68

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Re: UK language
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2021, 09:17:00 am »
Hi All,

Here's some good ones

Some I think are especially pertinent

8. Bollocks

Perhaps one of the most internationally famous British slang terms, ‘bollocks’ has a multitude of uses, although its top ones including being a curse word used to indicate dismay, e.g. ‘Oh bollocks’; it can also be used to express derision and mocking disbelief, e.g. ‘You slept with Kate Upton last night? Bollocks…’; and, of course, it also refers to the scrotum and testicles.

For example, ‘I kicked him right in the bollocks when he wouldn’t let me go past.’

9. Bollocking

Very different to the ‘bollocks’ of the previous suggestion, a ‘bollocking’ is a telling-off or a severe or enthusiastic reprimand from a boss, co-worker, partner, or anyone you like, for a misdemeanour.

For example, ‘My wife gave me a real bollocking for forgetting to pick up the dry cleaning on my way home from work.’

10. Brass Monkeys

A more obscure British term, ‘brass monkeys’ is used to refer to extremely cold weather. The phrase comes from the expression, ‘it’s cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey’.

For example, ‘You need to wear a coat today, it’s brass monkeys outside.’

18. <penis> Up

‘<penis> up’ – a British slang term that is far from the lewdness its name suggests. A ‘<penis> up’ is a mistake, a failure of large or epic proportions.

For example, ‘The papers sent out to the students were all in the wrong language – it’s a real <penis> up.’ Also, ‘I cocked up the orders for table number four.’

Enjoy
Carla


« Last Edit: April 06, 2021, 06:29:46 am by Rakel »
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Offline Angelaney

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Re: UK language
« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2021, 12:34:44 am »
Yes, hahahaha. I know several older people who still say it. As well as "Toodle pip." Both work.

I use "toodle pip" in email and instant messaging such as MS teams, and although most know what it means, it causes quite a bit of confusion :p

"toodle loo" is more Australian I believe.

Offline SarahEL

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Re: UK language
« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2021, 06:22:04 am »
Some specific words and phrases from the Midlands area of the UK..

Buttie.. a sandwich
Belta..  something really good.. (that motor is a belta!)..
Bins..   glasses, specs.
Blart.. to cry  (Stop blarting!)
Donnie...  a hand (give us your donnie).
'go round the Wrekin' ....  to gabble (talk) on and on about nothing..
Mither..  to worry something or someone.. (stop, mithering me.. She's all a mither).
Yampy..  going mad, or being weird...

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Offline Carla68

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Re: UK language
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2021, 08:47:03 am »
Numpty is a nice sounding one means idiot

as in she was a numpty for posting a link before 500 posts!!!

Carla

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Offline pamelatransuk

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Re: UK language
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2021, 09:26:08 am »
Just another 3 points on the goodbye theme:

1. Also occasionally heard, TTFN: Ta Ta For Now

2. See you later used to mean see you later today, but over the last 20 years has extended to mean see you sometime in the future.

3. See yous later. Yes essentially pluralising you to yous even if only talking to one person.

Language evolves gradually both regionally and nationally.

Hugs

Pamela xx

Offline pamelatransuk

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Re: UK language
« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2021, 07:54:24 am »
Yup, it is.

This video is quite enlightening. Although even I, born in England, can't understand a word some of the speakers are saying. No wonder Americans need subtitles in some movies.



Thank you Sephirah. Quite a few in which I also did not understand the words.

I enjoyed listening to the video. I am sure some accents will change to some degree and new ones will gradually come to fruition over the years.

Hugs

Pamela xx

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